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Don't miss this opportunity! Baltic sea coast with sandy beach and comfortable apartments in the city center is always at your service!

Amber
  • Amber
Amber
  • Amber
Amber
  • Amber
Amber
  • Amber

Apartment hotel "Amber" welcomes you Combining comfort and convenient location makes the apartment an ideal place for rest and business for those who want to stay in Liepaja. Apartment hotel "Amber" - a  building with classical architecture.

Our hotel has 9 apartments of different categories, from studio to family class apartments, ranging from 35 to 65 square meters

Our apartments will satisfy of any tourist or businessman requirements.

56"30'28 21"0'46
56.507774, 21.012663
  • Languages spoken: 
    • English
    • German
    • Latvian
    • Russian
  • Rooms total: 
    9
    Beds total: 
    24
  • Payment methods: 
    • Bank transfer
    • Cash
    • Credit/debit card
Services: 
  • Car parking
  • Internet
  • Pets allowed
Ratings:
Star rating: 
3
Last updated: 04.06.2014

In 1870 Mr Horn built the first hotel in Majori, and a concert garden where the famous symphonic orchestras performed. In 1896 the first movie in Jūrmala was shown here. Despite the fact that in 1913 the Horn’s Garden together with all the ambient buildings burnt down in fire, now  Jūrmala cultural centre is located there and the music again  is played in the garden. The Horn’s garden was renovated in 2005.

Services: 
  • Themed events

Miers means "peace" in Latvian, and if you want to get away from the hustle and bustle of downtown Riga, a peaceful haven awaits you in the Bohemian-style quarter on Miera Street, with its string of charming cafes and shops.

Every year, one day in the month of May, Miera Street is closed to traffic for its special festival featuring live music, performances, games&attractions, an arts&crafts fair, various workshops. On nearby Aristida Briāna Street, at the cafe/night club Piens (Latvian: milk), summertime brings its festival (usually on a Sunday) for outdoor concerts, refreshing milkshakes and new friends.

A new and already-popular addition to the quarter – right next to Piens, is the 9kl Arts Centre, just a few doors from the micro-brewery Labietis, with its very own brands made from unusual ingredients.

Meanwhile, at Miera 22, it’s the Chocolate Museum at the Laima Confectionary with its unique interactive exhibit. A bit farther ahead is another venue for artistic endeavors – the territory of the former tobacco factory (Tabakas fabrika).

Still forward, within walking distance, is Lielie kapi - the former mayoral cemetery (late 18th century), now resting place for many celebrities.

The University of Latvia is a higher education and scientific research institution. It is the largest university in the Baltic countries in terms of student numbers.

The University of Latvia offers students to earn bachelor and master’s degrees in humanities, pedagogical sciences, social sciences, natural sciences and health care. The university also offers professional studies for bachelor and master’s degrees, as well as professional qualifications. Those who wish to pursue a doctorate have several doctoral study programmes in natural sciences to choose from.

Foreign students can enroll in several bachelor programmes at the University of Latvia, as well as study for a doctorate or attend further education courses to learn various foreign languages. 

The new Latvian National Library building, also known as the “Palace of Light”, was designed by the famous Latvian-American architect Gunārs Birkerts. The library opens the year Riga is designated the European Capital of Culture.

 The Latvian National Library is located on the left bank of the Daugava. It is home to over one thousand reading desks and rooms for group lectures, exhibitions, public debates, presentations and other such happenings.

The new library is arriving in tandem with the uniform library information system or “Network of Light”, which makes it possible to access Latvian National Library materials from any other library in Latvia. 

The Art Academy of Latvia was founded in 1919. The academy occupies one of the most impressive architectural monuments of the early 20th century in Riga - a Neo-gothic building in Riga centre that originally housed Riga Stock Exchange Union’s School of Commerce.

The Art Academy of Latvia encompasses several departments to study visual arts, visual plastic arts, design, audio-visual art, theory of art. The academy collaborates with a number of art academies in other countries, offering students to participate in exchange programmes and in international developments.

An interesting experiece in Riga is a visit to the gallery "Noass” and "Betanovuss”, docked in the Daugava River at the AB jetty. The gallery is managed by the culture/arts project "Noass”, one of the first non-governmental organisations in Latvia whose mission is to provide a contemporary artistic milieu for the community, and host appealing special events for foreign tourists.  

On the deck of  "Noass” and "Betanovuss” is where a wide range of art exhibits, modern dance performances and poetry and prose readings take place. For over 10  years, the floating gallery has been associated with the international contemporary and video art festival "Ūdensgabali”, offering the latest video experiments from around the world.

During major festivals and events in Riga, that are well-attended, "Noass” and "Betanovuss” always line up an interesting programme of their own. Two examples here are the international "Night of Museums” and the Riga City Festival.

On the "Betanovuss” premises, the unique permanent collection of the Museum of Naive Art can be found, with works from as far back as the 18th century. Several hundred entities, with special attention given to Latvian artists of today. 

The building which housed the KGB or Committee for State Security Headquarters in Riga during the Soviet period has opened for the general public as a feature of Riga’s year as the European Capital of Culture.

The building at the intersection of Brīvības Street and Stabu Street used to go by the name of Stūra māja (corner house) – obviously because of its location, as well as for a long history of putting many people in a very tight corner indeed.

The KGB was a particularly repressive authority that the Bolsheviks established soon after coming to power in Russia in 1917. They set up the Emergency Commission, or Cheka, to seek and eliminate opponents of Bolshevism. Since then, Cheka and KGB were the terms used to denote the entire oppressive Soviet system, regardless of the name changes the authority went through.

The KGB building in Riga has been unable to find new tenants. In order to turn the spotlight on and prompt discussion about the history of the building, the KGB House is open to the general public from April 30 to October 31 this year, offering an extensive educational and cultural programme. The first, fourth, fifth and sixth floors of the building showcase history and art exhibitions about the building, visitors are also offered guided tours of the building's legendary ominous basement.

Ķīpsala International Exhibition Centre is the largest specialised exhibition centre in the Baltic countries. This is where, all year long, thematic exhibits take place every weekend, as well as various sports, cultural and recreational events.

The Ķīpsala International Exhibition Centre includes two main halls, three spacious conference halls, and two more rooms with seating capacity of up to forty people. There is a guarded car park near the centre.

Various exhibitions are held in Ķīpsala all year round, many of which have become popular events that the public looks forward to attending. These include “School”, Baltic Book Fair, fairs dedicated to cars, photography, agricultural machinery, tourism, textiles and others, accompanied by all kinds of events.

Ķīpsala Exhibition Centre also hosts impressive cultural and recreational events, including dancesport festivals, Christmas concerts, large-scale dancing and sports events for adults and children.

Built in 1207 as a castellum type fortress, later rebuilt into a convent type building. From 2012 it is possible to climb up the North Tower, the Main Gate Tower and enjoy the medieval aura. Virtual tour: www.promotour.lv/tour/sigulda-2/

In the ancient Gauja valley, shaped by the River Gauja and its tributaries, dozens of stone castles were erected and occupied in addition to the many castle mounds that were built by earlier locals. This area has the greatest concentration of castles not only in Latvia but also in Eastern Europe.

Geographically, the Gauja valley played an important role during the Crusades due to its existing network of waterways and land roads that were already in place. The valley was also home to a variety of ethnic groups who each controlled their own lands. During the 13th century many new territories were established on the basis of war and battle.

Sigulda Medieval Castle was built by the Livonian Brothers of the Sword who were later incorporated into the Teutonic Order of the castle, thus the castle eventually became the property of the Livonian Order.

The Livonian Brothers of the Sword, officially known as The Militia of Christ of Livonia, was a military order comprised of German "warrior monks.” They later became better known as the Livonian Brothers of the Sword due to the symbols on their white capes: a red sword and cross. The order, founded in 1202, was the first "warrior monk” order formed outside the Mediterranean region. Historical documents indicate Bishop Albert and Cistercian Abbot Teoderih were the co-founders of the order. The military order’s mission was to remain in Livonia to protect the land and conquer new territories.

As part of the land division between themselves and Bishop Albert in 1207, the order gained the territory which stretched along the left side of the Gauja River. In the ongoing competition to determine hegemony between the Bishop and the Livonian Order, castle placement became a strategic factor. According to the Rhymed Chronicles, Sigulda Medieval Castle was erected sometime between 1207 and 1209 under the direction of Master Venno of the Order of the Brethren of the Sword. The Chronicle of Henry of Livonia says that the castle was in use by the Brothers of the Sword as a base while battling revolting Livs that were invading from a nearby castle.

Sigulda Medieval Castle was initially built to monitor and control the water ways of the Gauja River and to fend off any invasion attempts from the nearby bishop’s castle in Turaida which was located on the river’s west coast. In 1224 the Pope’s legate, Wilhelm of Modena, stayed at the castle and established both a church and parish. In 1237 the lands of the Livonian Brothers of the Sword become the property of the German Order who continued to conquer additional territories in Latvia up until 1290. 

At the very beginning of the Livonian war, Sigulda Medieval Castle was damaged and in 1562 it became a part of the PolishStarostwo. At the end of the 16th century, the Poles repaired the castle and its surrounding buildings. During the Polish – Swedish war the castle was seriously damaged. After the war, the Swedes reported that the castle was empty and destroyed.  In the 1622 it was again restored and a new residential building and sauna were built. 

In 1737 Sigulda became a private estate. It was first the property of Count Lasi, followed by Brown and the Borhs. In the 19th century the castle and its layout were remodeled and a gate, inscribed with the year 1867, was added to the front part of the castle. The gate tower surrounding the inner castle building was decorated with the Borh family coat of arms. Additionally, the ruins of the castle were fortified and two pseudo-gothic arches were constructed. Finally, between 1878 and 1881, a new castle was built by Duke Kropotkin’s family.

At the beginning of the 19th century the castle once again got attention but, following the trend of the times, it was simply admired as a romantic ruin. Monument protection concerns caused some construction work to be done in order to renew the gate tower and other important parts of the castle.  Due to its importance as a tourist attraction, the castle walls have been fortified many times in the 20th century.

After WWI with the establishment of Latvia, the ruins have been under the auspices of the Monument Board.

In 2011, the European Union co-sponsored a project designed to assist with the renovations. It was officially titled “Reconstruction of Sigulda Castle Ruins and Infrastructure Adjustment for Tourism Development” and successfully concluded in 2012.

All of this has resulted in the reconstruction of the castle ruins and it’s surroundings which makes it a unique tourist attraction combining a rich cultural history in an ecologically clean environment.

You are welcome to climb up into the Castle’s southern and northern towers which have been opened for the first time since the renovations. Take a walk on the walls of the ruins to enjoy the pristine atmosphere and the beautiful views of Gauja river valley and the nearby historical monuments. The technical part of this project was executed by the office of Inara Caunite. 

Annual concerts and festivals are organized on the open air stage of Sigulda castle-ruins. The season traditionally opens in May with the Cherry Blossom Ball followed by the Jazz Festival, Blues Festival and Theater Day.  The most remarkable event is the Opera Festival, originally initiated 20 years ago by Dainis Kalns and held in Sigulda ever since.

Livonian Order’s castle in Sigulda to its visitors offers explicit and historically active journey within the everyday life of Livonian Order’s Brotherhood. Visitors vill discoverhow the inner structure of the Order was formed and how did it function; how did Order’s brothers and servants dress and arm themselves; what was the everyday life and military campaigns of the Order’s brotherhood like. More information: http://tourism.sigulda.lv/journey-within-the-everyday-life-of-livonian-order-s-brotherhood/